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Monkstown - Cork City - across river

Monkstown (Baile an Mhanaigh in Irish) is a village in County Cork, Ireland, situated southeast of Cork city. The village is on the estuary of the River Lee, facing Great Island and looking onto Monkstown Bay. Many have claimed that a monastery once stood in Monkstown, close to the site of Monkstown castle. However, recent research has shown that the area was the site for monastic agricultural use. The castle, for which the town is famed, is in fact not a castle at all but a fortified Tower House. It was constructed around 1636 by Anastsia ArchDeacon nee Gould as a surprise gift for her husband who was fighting with the Spanish catholics in the continental wars of the time.

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Photo Details

  • County: Cork
  • Town: Cork City
  • Scene: Monkstown
  • Date: circa 1910

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  • Read about Monkstown below

Monkstown

Monkstown (Baile an Mhanaigh in Irish) is a village in County Cork, Ireland, situated southeast of Cork city. The village is on the estuary of the River Lee, facing Great Island and looking onto Monkstown Bay. Many have claimed that a monastery once stood in Monkstown, close to the site of Monkstown castle. However, recent research has shown that the area was the site for monastic agricultural use. The castle, for which the town is famed, is in fact not a castle at all but a fortified Tower House. It was constructed around 1636 by Anastsia ArchDeacon nee Gould as a surprise gift for her husband who was fighting with the Spanish catholics in the continental wars of the time.

As legend would have us believe, when John ArchDeacon's ship entered Monkstown bay, a cannon ball was fired at the castle which was believed to house enemies. This could not have happened due to the relative distance of the castle from the bay. Fact is stranger than fiction however when one reviews the accounts of the building costs of the castle. Anastasia ArchDeacon hired workers to come to Monkstown to build the castle. She housed the workers in accommodation built specially for them. She also provided them with food and clothing but all for a price! Once the workers had paid their rent and settled up their bills with her, the overall cost of the castle worked out at about four pence. The ArchDeacons are buried close by in the now overgrown graveyard.

The above is not to be confused with Monkstown Castle, Dublin although Michael Boyle, Lord Chancellor and Archbishop of Armagh, owned both.

Revised history (Feb 15 2007 JES) 1539 King Henry VIII awarded the Monkstown lands to Sir John Travers, Master of the Ordnance in Ireland. John Travers lived in his Castle at Monkstown from 1557 to his death in 1562 and buried in the Carrickbrennan graveyard where the property fell to James Eustace 3rd Viscount Baltinglass through his marriage to Mary Travers. 1580 The Castle was used as a rebellion stronghold when it was awarded to Sir Henry Wallop the Vice Treasurer of Ireland. The lands were later returned to Mary, widow Baltinglass who later married Gerald Alymer.

On her death in 1610 the Castle was transferred to the Chevers family through the marriage of Mary Travers's sister Catherine to John Chevers, and the property passed directly to his second son Henry Chevers, who married Catherine, daughter of Sir Richard Fitzwilliam, of Merrion, co.Dublin Henry & Catherine Chevers lived with their 4 children (Walter, Thomas, Patrick, Margaret). On the death of Henry in 1640, the Castle and lands were passed to Walter Cheevers. Walter and family were given command to vacate Monkstown in 1653, by the Cromwellian Commissioners, and transplanted to Killyan, co.Galway. 1660 Walter Cheevers was restored to to his estate at Monkstown Castle until his death in 1678. Monkstown was later purchased by Bishop of Armagh Michael Boyle where his son enlarged the Castle making it one of the finest residences. The Shivers family of America trace their lineage to Thomas Chevers brother of Walter Chevers of Monkstown, Ire, through the Cromwellian authorized Nov 26 1653 warrant for Capt John Whittey to transport the Thomas Chevers family to America.

  • Monkstown first mention in 1450 - Tenants Cistercians at Carrickbrennan, Villa Monachorum (Monkstown)
  • Records of the Abbey of the Blessed Vigin Mary 1640
  • Forfeiting Proprietors under the Cromwellon Settlement 1657
  • The differences in data previously based on religiously biased versions.