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Phoenix Park Entrance - B/W - Dublin City

circa 1910

Phoenix Park (in Irish, Páirc an Fhionn-Uisce) is a large park located 3 km to the north west of Dublin city centre in Ireland. It measures 712 hectares (1752 acres), with a walled circumference of 16 km that contains large areas of grassland and tree-lined avenues. The park is home to a herd of wild Fallow deer. The name is a corruption of the Irish fionn uisce meaning 'clear water'.

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Photo Details

  • County: DublinCity Center
  • Town: Parkgate St
  • Scene: Entrance to Phoenix Park
  • Date: circa 1910

Specification

  • Digitally remastered
  • 10' x 8' printed on quality photo paper
  • Also available mounted & framed, ask for details
  • Colour images can be printed in black & white if preferred.
  • Read about Phoenix Park below

Phoenix Park

Phoenix Park (in Irish, Páirc an Fhionn-Uisce) is a large park located 3 km to the north west of Dublin city centre in Ireland. It measures 712 hectares (1752 acres), with a walled circumference of 16 km that contains large areas of grassland and tree-lined avenues. The park is home to a herd of wild Fallow deer. The name is a corruption of the Irish fionn uisce meaning 'clear water'.

It is one of the largest enclosed city parks in Europe. Richmond Park in London, England is larger at 2,500 acres (10 km²). Phoenix Park is larger than both Central Park in New York and Hyde Park in London.

History

After the Normans conquered Dublin and its hinterland in the 12th century Hugh Tyrell, 1st Baron of Castleknock, granted a large area of land, including what now comprises the Phoenix Park, to the Knights of St. John of Jerusalem. They established an abbey at Kilmainham on the site now occupied by the Royal Hospital. The knights lost their lands when Henry VIII confiscated monastic properties in 1537 and eighty years later the lands once more reverted to the ownership of the King's representatives in Ireland. On the restoration of Charles II, his Viceroy in Dublin, Lord Ormonde established a Royal Hunting Park which contained pheasants and wild deer, therefore it was necessary to enclose the entire area with a wall. It was opened to the people of Dublin by Lord Chesterfield in 1747.

Motor racing

Motor racing first took place in Phoenix Park in 1903 when the Irish Gordon Bennett Race Speed Trials were held on the main straight for both cars and motorcycles. This was followed in 1929 by the Irish International Grand Prix; the first of three Irish motor racing grand prixs. Racing took place between 1932 until the beginning of World War II in 1939 and was revived again in 1949 with a sprint on the Oldtown circuit followed the next year by a full racing meeting again and has been used virtually continuously until today. Over the years seven different circuits have been used, two of which are named after the famous Ferrari World Champion racing driver Mike Hawthorn.

Significant features

Áras an Uachtaráin

The residence of the President of Ireland (Áras an Uachtaráin) is located in the park.

Residence of the American Ambassador

The residence of the Ambassador of the United States of America is located in the park.

Zoological Gardens

One of the main attractions in the park is Dublin Zoo. It was founded in 1830 making it the third oldest in the world. Visitors can see more than 700 animals and tropical birds from around the world here.

Papal Cross

The Papal Cross was erected for the visit of Pope John Paul II in September 1979. Over one million people attended an open air mass in the park at the time.

Wellington Monument

The Wellington Monument, a 62m (205 foot) tall obelisk memorial for the Duke of Wellington.

Deerfield Residence

The Deerfield Residence was the former residence of the Chief Secretary of Ireland. It is now the official residence of the United States Ambassador to Ireland.

The Phoenix Monument

This monument in shape of a Corinthian column with a Phoenix bird rising from the ashes at its pinnacle. It was erected by Lord Chesterfield in 1747.

Phoenix Park Visitor Centre and Ashtown Castle

The oldest building in the park is Ashtown Castle, a restored medieval tower house dating from the 17th century. It is located beside the Visitors Centre where the public can enjoy 5,500 years of historical interpretation of the park through the ages.

Other places of interest

The headquarters of the Irish national police force, An Garda Síochána, are located in the park. It also contains several sports grounds providing a wealth of recreational activities for football, soccer, cricket and polo.

The State Guest House, Farmleigh, adjoins the park to the north-west. The south western corner of the park is known as the Furry Glen and has a series of short walks centred around a small lake with birds, plants and wildlife.

The park is featured prominently in James Joyce's novel, Finnegans Wake, and tangentially in Ulysses. It is occasionally used for open-air concerts and the annual Phoenix Park Motor Races.