:-)

USA TOLL FREE #
1-800-656-1408

REST OF THE WORLD
+353 876 220 788

pay with Master Card
pay with VISA
pay with PayPal
Fedex courier service

Drogheda - Louth - Glenmore

circa 1910

Drogheda (Droichead Átha in Irish, meaning 'Bridge of the Ford') is an industrial and port town in County Louth (on the county line with Meath) on the east coast of Ireland, 56 km (35 mi) north of Dublin. Within legally defined boundaries, Drogheda is the second largest town in Ireland, behind Dundalk; however, the town's total population (including suburbs and environs) is recorded to be 35,090, five inhabitants more than its county neighbour. The River Boyne, split the town in half between County Meath and County Louth until the enactment of the Local Government (Ireland) Act 1898 which saw a large area of Drogheda, south of the Boyne signed over to form part of an extended Co Louth

OPTIONS AVAILABLE FOR THIS ARTICLE

Size:
Mount/Frame:
* Options may affect the price/weight of an article
Choose Quantity:

Price:  *

* Made to Order, will ship 5 to 10 business days after purchase

Photo Details

  • County: Louth
  • Town: Drogheda
  • Scene:Glenmore, lake view
  • Date: 1910 (estimate)

Specification

  • Digitally remastered
  • 10' x 8' printed on quality photo paper
  • Also available mounted & framed, ask for details
  • Colour images can be printed in black& white if preferred.
  • Read about Drogheda Town below

Drogheda

Drogheda (Droichead Átha in Irish, meaning 'Bridge of the Ford') is an industrial and port town in County Louth (on the county line with Meath) on the east coast of Ireland, 56 km (35 mi) north of Dublin. Within legally defined boundaries, Drogheda is the second largest town in Ireland, behind Dundalk; however, the town's total population (including suburbs and environs) is recorded to be 35,090, five inhabitants more than its county neighbour. The River Boyne, split the town in half between County Meath and County Louth until the enactment of the Local Government (Ireland) Act 1898 which saw a large area of Drogheda, south of the Boyne signed over to form part of an extended Co Louth. With the passing of the County of Louth and Borough of Drogheda (Boundaries) Provisional Order, 1976, County Louth again grew larger at the expense of County Meath. However the 2007 - 2013 Meath County Development Plan recognises the Drogheda environs as a primary growth centre on par with Navan. This plan in conjunction with ambitious plans for growth to the north of the town by Louth County Council will growth for Drogheda in the future, despite not obtaining Gateway status in the Irish government's National Spatial Strategy.

In recent years Drogheda has been shedding its industrial image, as an increasing number of people employed in the retail, services and technology sectors have been looking to the local economy instead of Dublin for employment.

History

The town is located close to the site of Newgrange, a burial mound constructed around 3200 BC. A trading post and settlement existed on the site of the town from Roman times and was known as Inver Colpa. The town itself was founded in 911 by the Danes and officially chartered as a town in 1194. The Irish Parliament moved to the town in 1494 and passed Poyning's Law a year later. The town was besieged twice during the Irish Confederate Wars (see the siege of Drogheda). On the second occasion it was taken by Oliver Cromwell in September 1649, as part of the Cromwellian conquest of Ireland. Drogheda was the site of an infamous massacre of the Royalist defenders. The Battle of the Boyne, 1690, occurred near the town at the River Boyne.

Drogheda's coat of arms bears the star and crescent and has its origin with King Richard I (the Lionheart), in whose reign Drogheda was granted its charter in 1194 by Hugh de Lacy (after whom the de Lacy bridge in Drogheda is named). Another Norman element on Drogheda's coat of arms is its centrepiece, St. Lawrence's Gate. The three lions which flank the Norman barbican are also taken from King Richard's coat of arms. On the other side of the barbican is a ship denoting Drogheda's status as an important port. The town's motto Deus praesidium, mercatura decus translates as 'God our strength, merchandise our glory'.

The Earldom of Drogheda was created in the Peerage of Ireland in 1661.

Drogheda acquired rail links to Dublin in 1844, Navan in 1850 and Belfast in 1852. Passenger services between Drogheda and Navan were ended in 1958, however the line remained open for freight traffic. In 1966 Drogheda station was renamed 'McBride'.

Arts and Entertainment

Drogheda has a thriving arts scene; it hosts the annual Samba festival every summer, where Samba bands from around the world converge on the town for a week of drumming and parades. It is also home to the Calipo theatre company which specialises in multi-media productions and has achieved considerable success in Ireland and abroad. The town also supports one of the largest and most successful youth theatres in Ireland (Droichead Youth Theatre) which has toured to Belfast, London, Italy, and Sweden. The addition of the Little Duke Theatre company in Duke Street, in the old Julian Blinds building, adds to this scene. The Municipal Centre in Stockwell Street acts as a base for most of the town's artists, under the umbrella of the Droichead Arts Centre, and featuring a gallery space and a theatre.

The former Garda (Police) station in West Street is now a satellite site of the Droichead Arts Centre.

The original Drogheda bypass bridge over the river Boyne, known as the 'Bridge of Peace', is well-known regionally for its aerosol graffiti murals. Under the bridge, there are two large concrete supports that measure approximately 8 metres high, and 20 metres long. Starting in the 1980s with the breakdance craze, these supports were painted and sprayed with murals by aerosol artists. This activity at the time was technically illegal and frowned upon by the local authorities. Today the murals are frequently updated and limited sponsorship of the artists is provided by local businesses.

Drogheda's larger bars feature live music. Notable venues are The Pheasant on Duleek Street, McPhail's in Laurence Street, and McHugh's on Cord Road. For traditional Irish music, Carberry's (Teach Uí Cairbre) pub near the North Quay has regular sessions by amateur and professional musicians alike.

October 2006 saw the opening of the town's first dedicated municipal art gallery and visual arts centre, the Highlanes Gallery, housed in the former Franciscan Friary on St. Laurence Street. The Highlanes Gallery holds Drogheda's important municipal art collection which dates from the 17th century as well as visiting exhibitions in a venue which meets key international museum and gallery standards.

Drogheda today

With the expansion of the Irish economy in the 1990s, during the 'Celtic Tiger' years, Drogheda has become one of the primary locations for people who work in Dublin to buy a house. Property prices in the capital are prohibitive for first time home buyers. With the expansion of transport infrastructure in the area around Drogheda i.e. the Swords and Balbriggan bypasses, the Boyne River Bridge and the increased number of commuter trains serving the town, Drogheda is now an attractive location for Dubliners to buy their first house and commute to work, the downtown area of Drogheda has been transformed over the past two years, two large shopping centres have opened, and large numbers of national and international retails have opened stores, the town's main street is currently under going a major face lift. The Boyne Cable Bridge in particular has dramatically increased the profile of the region as a location for out-of-town retail parks.

The renovation of the former Grammar School in Laurence Street as a shopping centre is unusual as the original fascia of the building has been restored to its former Georgian architectural specifications. This centre extends to Palace Street, all along William Street, and down Peter Street on the site of the former Parochial Hall. The Laurence Town Centre Boasts its anchor store Marks & Spencer. Other shops included in this very upmarket centre Hilfiger Denim,United colors of Benetton, Pepe Jeans, Vero Moda,Fran & Jane,Premaman Childrens Clothing & Maternity Wear and many other top stores. A large underground carpark is also present with Parking Rates from Just €1.00 per hour the lowest in town. A Parents room is also available with Changing facilites, Microwave, Bottle warmer and a comfortable private room for mothers feeding.

On the south quay in the space of the former Lakeland Daries premises (an old industrial area), the Scotch Hall Shopping Centre and the D hotel was completed in November 2005. A new pedestrian bridge extends from the north quay, at Mayoralty Street, into the complex, phase two which is about to commence construction which will extend further down along the river front, it will have an extension to the Shopping Centre and Hotel, new apartments, cinema, and a riverside plaza.

Local economy

The local economy of Drogheda, like that of many other towns in Ireland, is changing rapidly. The old industrial industries based around linen and textiles, brewing, shipping, and manufacturing have now disappeared or are in decline.

There are still a number of large employers in the town including Boyne Valley Foods, Irish Cement (Ireland's largest cement works), Drogheda Concentrates (Coca Cola), International Flavours & Fragrances (IFF) and Becton Dickenson.

Drogheda offers many advantages over other towns in the region including:

  • Location close to M1 (E1 Euro Route 1) (main Dublin - Belfast motorway) necessary for international trading
  • Road and rail infrastructure
  • Availability of broadband and telecommunications services
  • Access to key markets of Dublin and Belfast
  • Services offered by Ireland's largest town with excellent selection of banking, retail, restaurant, hotel, sporting, conference and entertainment
  • High quality of living with access to beaches and countryside

Recently additions to the local ecomony include:

  • IDA Business & Technology Park: a 25 hectare (63 acre) with direct access onto the Dublin / Belfast motorway developed and landscaped for the needs of both the IT and financial and internationally traded services sectors.
  • International Fund Services, a leading provider of fund accounting and administration services to the hedge fund industry globally, is to establish a hedge fund administration operation in Drogheda, Co. Louth with the creation of up to 235 jobs.
  • 8 Enterprise Incubation units for high tech startup companies are now provided in the Milmount complex.

Sport

In December 2005 the town's soccer team, Drogheda United, won the national FAI Carlsberg Cup for the first time in its history by beating Cork City F.C. 2-0 in the final at Lansdowne Road. On Saturday 22 April 2006 Drogheda United won the Setanta Cup at Tolka Park becoming the champions of all Ireland. Drogheda United is known as 'The Drogs' by their fans.In 2006 Louth won the NFL Div 2 and the Tommy Murphy cup.

Points of interest

  • Boyne Viaduct
  • Millmount Fort
  • St Peter's Roman Catholic Church - Houses the head of St. Oliver Plunkett.
  • Laurence's Gate
  • Newgrange
  • nearby Monasterboice

Noted natives and residents

  • Nick Colgan, Goalkeeper for Republic of Ireland football team
  • James Cullen, mathematician who discovered what are now known as the Cullen numbers
  • Ian Harte, Levante UD and Republic of Ireland full-back. Nephew of Gary Kelly
  • Gary Kelly, footballer and charity campaigner
  • Jonathan Kelly, singer-songwriter
  • Michael Scott, architect who designed Busaras and the Abbey Theatre
  • Eamonn Campbell, famous Guitarist and Music Producer, member of The Dubliners.
  • Sean Thornton, Doncaster midfielder and former Republic Of Ireland under 21 football player
  • T.K. Whitaker, former Irish economist who wrote the Programme for Economic Expansion
  • Deirdre Gogarty, 1997 WIBF Featherweight Title Champion (Women's Boxing)