:-)

USA TOLL FREE #
1-800-656-1408

REST OF THE WORLD
+353 876 220 788

pay with Master Card
pay with VISA
pay with PayPal
Fedex courier service

Kells - Meath - Headford Place

circa 1910

In 1152, the Synod of Kells completed the transition of the Roman Catholic Church of Ireland from a monastic church to the diocesan church that continues today. While called the Synod of Kells, this important Synod was transferred to Mellifont, Co Louth, and held there in March 1152. Kells was raised to a Diocese by the Synod, but was later reduced to parochial status. At the end of the 12th century Hugh de Lacy was granted the whole of Meath and under the Anglo-Normans the religious establishments at Kells flourished.

OPTIONS AVAILABLE FOR THIS ARTICLE

Size:
Mount/Frame:
* Options may affect the price/weight of an article
Choose Quantity:

Price:  *

* Made to Order, will ship 5 to 10 business days after purchase

Photo Details

  • County: Meath
  • Town: Kells
  • Scene: Headford Place
  • Date: 1910 (estimate)

Specification

  • Digitally remastered
  • 10' x 8' printed on quality photo paper, larger, sizes also available
  • Also available mounted & framed, ask for details
  • Colour images can be printed in black & white if preferred.
  • Read about Kells below

Kells

Kells (Irish: Ceanannas, 'Great Chief Abode') is a town in County Meath in Ireland. The town lies on the N3 road, and lies 10 miles from Navan and 40 miles from Dublin.

History

The monastery at Kells is thought to have been first founded around 804 A.D. It was founded by monks fleeing from St Colmcille's Iona monastery, to escape Viking invasions.

In 1152, the Synod of Kells completed the transition of the Roman Catholic Church of Ireland from a monastic church to the diocesan church that continues today. While called the Synod of Kells, this important Synod was transferred to Mellifont, Co Louth, and held there in March 1152. Kells was raised to a Diocese by the Synod, but was later reduced to parochial status. At the end of the 12th century Hugh de Lacy was granted the whole of Meath and under the Anglo-Normans the religious establishments at Kells flourished.

Kells, as border town of the Pale, was the scene of many battles, between Anglo, Irish and Norman fighters. During Tudor times, it was used as a mustering place for soldiers.

From 1561 to 1800 Kells returned two Members of Parliament to the Irish House of Commons.

The period of the Irish Potato Famine saw the population of Kells drop by 38 as measured by the census records of 1841 and 1851. The Workhouse and the Fever Hospital were described as full to overflowing.

In recent years the town has expanded considerably with many Dublin commuters moving to the town. It was recently voted Worst Town In Ireland in a poll of Irish Examiner readers, much to the dismay of the people of Kells.

Places of interest

The Abbey of Kells, with its round tower, is associated with St Columba (also called St Colmcille) and with the Book of Kells, now kept at Trinity College Dublin. The round tower and five large Celtic crosses that can still be viewed today. Four of the crosses are in the church yard of St Columba's church, the other, a large Celtic cross that was positioned in the middle of a busy crossroads, until an unfortunate accident involving a cumbersome articulated lorry. It now stands in front of a former courthouse (which is now a museum and coffeeshop), and has a roof over it to protect it from the elements.

Close by the graveyard of St. Columba's church stands a small stoned roofed Oratory (St. Columcille's House). This probably dates from the 11th century. Access to the monks' sleeping accommodation aloft is by ladder. This small rectangular building is positioned at one of the highest points in the town. The Oratory is kept locked, but visitor access can be arranged.

Just outside the town on the road to Oldcastle, stands the Tower of Lloyd. This interesting towering building is an 18th century folly in the form of a lighthouse erected to the memory of Sir Thomas Taylor, 1st Earl of Bective, by his son. The tower is approx. 100 feet high, and from the top one can see magnificent views of the surrounding countryside and as far as the Mourne mountains in County Down, Northern Ireland on a clear day. The plaque on the tower reads: 'This pillar was designed by Henry Aaron Baker Esq. architect was executed by Mr. Joseph Beck stone cutter Mr. Owen Mc Cabe head mason Mr. Bartle Reilly overseer Anno 1791'.

The area around the tower has been developed as a community park (The People's Park), and includes the Paupers' Grave. This cemetery was a necessity in the times of great poverty in the country. Mass is still celebrated there annually and the cemetery is a grim reminder of the Workhouse and the extreme poverty which was engendered by changes in farming practice in the 19th century and also of the Famine.

Population

The population of Kells in April 2002 was 4421 people (according to the 2002 Census of Population). This repesented an increase of 879 people over the 1996 Census. This was a 24.8 increase in total population between 1996 and 2002.

Name

The name Kells derives from Kenlis, an anglicization of the Irish language word 'Ceann Lios'. Ceann Lios, meaning 'head fort' appears to be another form of the name Ceannanus Mór. Kells, Kenlis and Headfort all feature in the titles taken by the Taylor family, and all contribute to local place names.

Transport

  • The town is serviced by a quarter-hourly bus service from Bus Éireann, the bus trip takes about 1.5 hours from Dublin.The Forthcoming M3 Motorway will cut this to 40 min .
  • Meath on Track are seeking reinstatement of the railway link to Navan, and on to Dublin. Kells to Dublin City Centre by train would take approximately 60 minutes depending on stops.